Poetry Elements

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Writing | Posted on 11/06/2015

This week, we have been learning about poetry elements. We know that poetry is used to express feelings or emotions. Good writers use different poetic elements to express their thinking. Your task is to select a picture from Storybird to create similes, metaphors, alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia or hyperboles. 

Book Review with a twist!

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Book Reviews, Reader's Response, Teaching Ideas, Writing | Posted on 03/04/2015

Are you looking for a fun, more engaging way for your students to create book reports?
Check out this!

Got HOPE?

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Book Reviews, Critical Thinking, Culturally Relevant Teaching, Global Education, Reader's Response, Teaching Ideas, Writing | Posted on 07/31/2014

 

Poetry for Hope is a book of poems written and illustrated by my 4th grade students. It was the product of a unit on poetry at the end of the year in the 4th grade class that I co-teach with another teacher.
We started by analyzing different poems and we soon realized how difficult it was for them to grasp the concept of metaphors. The poem that we were reading was about hope, which they did not know the meaning of, but the poet was comparing it to a bird. When it was time for them to write their own metaphors, they struggled because they did not know what hope was. We were using a metaphor to introduce the concept, but they did not know what the word’s meaning. Until I thought about connecting it to something that almost all of us in that class had in common (including the other teacher)… and that is: Immigration. So, picture this… two immigrant teachers teaching the meaning of hope to immigrant students! It was the most amazing teaching moment ever! So, that is how the book was developed.
We started off by asking: What does hope mean to you? before they wrote their own metaphors. We sat we them, one by one to bring out their personal experiences and feelings that most of them had never dealt with. It was an incredible experience to make them feel successful by sharing their own stories. Then, they started producing their metaphors; hope is…
We ended the unit with a presentation for parents, other teachers and students and school administrators. While we were guiding them in their writing, I immediately thought about a book, but I wanted it to be different, so I recorded their voices and created QR codes so you can scan and listen to them reading their poems too!
After finishing the presentation, I told them that we thought we were teaching them something, but instead they taught us a lot more! We learned not only the meaning of determination, resilience, family, but also why we do what we do!

How to properly use apostrophes

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Teaching Ideas, Writing | Posted on 04/04/2014

Apostrophes The Story of Bob and Muffin

by MKayMann.
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Rules for Capital letter usage

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Teaching Ideas, Writing | Posted on 03/28/2014

Common Rules for Capital Letter Usage

by grammar.net.
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Earth Day: Save the Elephants!

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Critical Thinking, Media Response, Writing | Posted on 04/25/2013


During this week, we have been celebrating Earth Day by reading, speaking, listening and writing about things we can do to help our planet.
In response to this video about the ivory trade in China, you will write to persuade your audience not to buy ivory so we can give elephants a voice like Celia Ho is doing it in China.

Piclits: Lesson Idea

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Teaching Ideas, Writing | Posted on 03/19/2013

PicLit from PicLits.com
See the full PicLit at PicLits.com
PicLit from PicLits.com
See the full PicLit at PicLits.com

As soon as I discovered Piclits, I knew I had to try it in my classroom! Piclits is a free online application that allows you to use beautiful images to inspire all sorts of writing. Under each picture, there’s a carefully selected word bank of nouns, adjectives, adverbs and punctuation marks to drag and drop in your picture. In addition, each word, after it is dropped on the image, provides you with a drop-down menu with more options.You can make your nouns plural and/or capitalize them in the same way you can select different verb tenses. If you want to use your own words, you can do it by just clicking on “free-style”.

There are numerous advantages to using this application in your classroom. One of them is that Piclits is ipad and smartboard friendly¬†. The other is that you don’t need to open an account to use it. If you open an account though, you can save your piclits, edit them and share them in social media.
Piclits could be use to teach punctuation, capitalization, noun-verb structure, elements of poetry, write full stories and whatever your creative mind can think of! If you haven’t tried yet, you should definitely check it out.

The Underground Railroad

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Critical Thinking, Research, Writing | Posted on 02/19/2013

The Trail of Tears

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Critical Thinking, Media Response, Reader's Response, Writing | Posted on 01/12/2013


Here are the Gloster rubric and the gloster checklist. Make sure you refer to them before publishing your glog.

Coolest Inventions of 2012

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Posted by Mrs. Wells | Posted in Critical Thinking, Media Response, Reader's Response, Tutorials, Writing | Posted on 12/18/2012


In class, we have read and discussed the article from TIME for Kids about the coolest inventions in 2012. For this post, you will watch the “Google Glass” in action by a user wearing them. After watching the video you will combine the information from both sources – the article and the video- to create a “tutorial” describing/explaining how these glasses work. Your audience will be people that never heard, seen or read anything about these glasses.

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